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The office for design, applied art and architecture Studio Makkink&Bey created the spatial design for the series of archive exhibitions entitled ‘Surprising Finds’. For each installment, Studio Makkink&Bey carries out a spatial intervention in the interior originally designed by OMA, freeing up the plan of the archive room and creating space for the collection, and guest interventions by young designers and artists.

For each edition, Studio Makkink & Bey invites three young designers, artists or architects to relate their practice to the archive. As an addition to the selected archival pieces (Something Old) each edition presents three works: a working area for one of the intervention guests (Something New), a site-specific installation of works on loan (something Borrowed) and an experiment (Something Blue).

BuroBELÉN/18-11-81

#5 Dressed by Achitects

BuroBELÉN is the driving force behind the label 18-11-81, which takes a fundamentally different approach to clothing than today's fashion industry. 18-11-81 concentrates on the timeless qualities of materials and approaches clothing from the ancient need to protect and cover the body.

Studio PLOTT

#5 Dressed by Achitects

Studio PLOTT recently built a 3D printer that is able to print textile-like structures of several square meters. Rudi Boiten and Mireille Burger are currently experimenting with printing graphic patterns that can best be compared to weaving, embroidery and macramé techniques.

Camiel Fortgens

#5 Dressed by Achitects

The project As Is by Camiel Fortgens is a sequel to his earlier project Paper Clothes. Fortgens does not regard his designs as fashion, but rather as a means to investigate how man relates to his clothing. How do we express our identity through clothing and what influence does the zeitgeist (fashion) have on society?

Lissa Zengerink

#4 Monuments to Peace

Designer Lissa Zengerink temporarily 'inhabits' the bunker of Het Nieuwe Instituut. In the exhibition space, she works on the design for a futuristic monument, based on a three-day dialogue with archivist Alfred Marks. With her project 'Check Out These 17 Amazing Stories About Grief And Relief, What Happens Next Will Amaze You...' she asks what a future without the Internet would bring.

Yuri Veerman & Martijn Engelbregt

#4 Monuments to Peace

Artist and designer Yuri Veerman opens the exhibition Monuments to Peace with a site-specific installation of his collection 'Free T-shirts'. Veerman ordered T-shirt online that were offered alongside 'free' bumper stickers and fridge magnets. An industry of opportunism disguised as a symbol of idealism. Yuri Veerman also selected a loan from the process artist Martijn Engelbregt (1972). Engelbregt asked people to reconnect to the earth by literally shaking its hand. His collection of ceramic casts and an overview poster remind us of the importance of love. During the opening of Monuments to Peace Yuri Veerman read a short text about his grandfather who smuggled people during World War II.

Philip Lüschen

#4 Monuments to Peace

Artist Philip Lüschen developed a new interactive installation that relates to the public. Lüschen creates site-specific work in which he disguises sculptures as everyday objects and uses his drawings as a scenario for actions in everyday life. With his intervention 'The War Romantic Test', Lüschen investigates the thin line between boredom during peacetime and the romance of war.

Leon de Bruijne

#3 The Netherlands builds in brick

Visual artist Leon de Bruijne explores the sense and senselessness of stuff in his kinetic installations, elevating daily routines to hypnotizing rhythms. With a revolving wheel of chutes, his work introduces a construction landscape that visitors encounter in the basement.

Harm Rensink

#3 The Netherlands builds in brick

Spatial designer Harm Rensink develops installations based on wellness and relaxation rituals. As an alternative to ‘taking a break’, he offers a poetic place of repose that is somewhere between a sand carpet and a warm sand bath. During the opening on the 31st of January, the interaction of the public with the Sauna site was filmed, and the resulting film is on display at this exhibiton.

Govert Flint & Rodrigo Alves Azevedo

#3 The Netherlands builds in brick

Designer Govert Flint together with choreographer Rodrigo Alves Azevedo, with whom he came up with the idea, questions the influence of space on movement, and how an environment is shaped when it is created through dance. In the in-situ experiment around a glass circle in the basement, Govert and a team of designers use pre-fabricated material to respond to the movement of a dancer, to build, to move, to build and so on. The dancer searches for new movements, the designer for new forms.

Afdeling Buitengewone zaken

#2 Nightbirds

Afdeling Buitengewone Zaken comprises six young designers/engineers who examine the social impact of things and systems. They are fascinated by the front and back of things. Their intervention in the exhibition welcomes you en route to the entrance. An installation of ‘open’ signs - icons of nightlife - which they collected from Rotterdam shopkeepers.

 

Maaike Fransen

#2 Nightbirds

Using costumes, clothes, performance and film, designer Maaike Fransen narrates new worlds. From her studio in the red-light district of Amsterdam, she has developed a series of costumes based on and in collaboration with local sex workers.

Filip Gilissen

#2 Nightbirds

Artist Filip Gilissen uses the language of commerce to comment on the cynical aspects of globalization and consumer-driven politics. Through events, performances and installations, he researches the one-liners of the entertainment industry.

Aliki van der Kruijs

#1 Summer Dreams

The concept of summer is sketched in air, water and flowering nature. Aliki van der Kruijs examines elements in the archival drawings to compose a contemporary blueprint of the archive. The print develops when exposed to sunlight.

Zoro Feigl

#1 Summer Dreams

Summer equals life, equals movement, equals the kinetic installations of Zoro Feigl. Feigl turns the central hanging ring into an architectural sculpture.

Rogier Arents

#1 Summer Dreams

Rogier Arents focuses on the visualization of science. Seeing is believing. Using a plotting machine, he investigates a new level of scale in his work as an illustrator. During the exhibition Summer Dreams, he develops a grid made up of hues of markers.